Georgia O’Keefe – A Pioneering Woman

Georgia O’Keeffe:’Black and Purple Petunias’, 1977, Offset Lithograph, advertising poster for the “Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival: The Fifth Season”. Hand signed in blue marker by O’Keefe. Size Picture: 19.75 x 24.5 in. Total size: 34.25 x 26.75 in. Excellent condition. Price upon request.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe:’White Shell with Red’, 1976, Offset Lithograph, advertising poster for the “Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival: The Fourth Season”. Hand signed in blue marker by O’Keefe. Size Picture: 20.5 x 26 in. Total size: 35 x 28 in. Good condition. Price upon request

 

Georgia O’Keeffe:’Ladder to the Moon’, 1974, Offset Lithograph, advertising poster for the “Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival: The Fourth Season”. Hand signed in blue marker by O’Keefe. Size Picture: 22.5 x 16.75 in. Total size: 37 x 24 in. Good condition. Price upon request

About these Artworks

Georgia O’Keeffe handsigned a small number of these posters, as she wanted to support the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival in the 1970s.

About Georgia O’Keefe

Georgia O’Keeffe (1887–1986) is one of the great artists of the twentieth century, and one of America’s most beloved and influential artists. The Georgia O’Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, New Mexico, holds the largest collection of her work, her archives, and her houses at Ghost Ranch and in Abiquiu. Georgia O’Keeffe was one of the foundational figures of American modernism and a pioneering woman in the arts. Widely celebrated and recognized for her flower paintings and Southwest landscapes. She left behind a remarkable legacy when she died at the age of ninety-eight. Her vivid visual vocabulary sensuous flowers, bleached bones against red sky and earth had a stunning, profound, and lasting influence on American art in this century. O’Keeffe’s personal mystique is as intriguing and enduring as her bold, brilliant canvases. She had an exceptional life from her girlhood and early days as a controversial art teacher to her discovery by the pioneering photographer of the New York avant-garde, Alfred Stieglitz, to her seclusion in the New Mexico desert, where she lived until her death.